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Theory Intro

 1   Strokes

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 3   Forming Outlines

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20  Suffixes Contracted

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1 Phrasing Intro & Contents list

2 Theory

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PAGE DATE 27 April 2012

Numerals are already a form of shorthand, and should be used wherever they are faster or more legible. They are sometimes called Arabic numerals to distinguish them from Roman numerals (e.g. MCMXII). Numeral (or figure) refers to the written sign, number refers to the mathematical concept, although in normal conversation the word "number" covers everything.

  • 1 2 3 - these are called "cardinal" numbers (from Latin "cardo" meaning hinge/pivot, hence pivotal, fundamental, main).

  • 1st, 2nd, 3rd (first, second, third) - these are called "ordinal" as they specify the order or position in a series.

In the captions to the shorthand examples, I have given the numbers in longhand words, as that is a more accurate rendering of what someone might say, especially as there are often several ways to speak a number:

1902 =
"one thousand nine hundred and two" (amount)
"nineteen hundred and two (amount or date)
"nineteen oh two" (date)
"one nine oh two" or "one nine zero two" (reference or identity e.g. file, phone, house)

100 = hundred, a hundred, one hundred, one oh oh, one zero zero, one double zero

Your transcription of dictated numbers will vary depending on the context of the piece. Small numbers and round larger numbers within a narrative are better transcribed as words e.g. five houses, twenty letters, a hundred people, a million trees. Precise amounts are generally clearer as numerals e.g. "we received 1,686 letters" or "We improved by 20% last year." A longhand sentence should never start with a numeral. The following website summarises the rules: www.dailywritingtips.com/10-rules-for-writing-numbers-and-numerals/

This page only deals with what shorthand you should write for reliability. Your shorthand notes do not need to reflect normal usage in longhand, but the outlines or numerals must be clear, as context cannot help you retrieve them from your notes if there is any ambiguity or clash of shapes.

CONTENTS

Table of outlines
Improve your numerals
Use shorthand outline
Use numeral
Distinguishing sets
Number contractions
Long slash
Percent
"Or" pairs
Currency
Fractions
Decimals
Time
Powers
Dates
Additional vocabulary

Table of Outlines

Outlines shaded pink = avoid outline, use numeral
Outlines shaded green = always use when alone

* = Alternative contraction available

Longhand Numeral   Ordinal  
one 1 Pitman New Era: one
Use outline when alone (numeral looks like "it" "do" and many others)
first
firstly
Pitman's New Era: first firstly
two 2

Pitman's New Era: two

second
secondly
Pitman's New Era: second secondly
three 3

Pitman's New Era: three

third
thirdly
Pitman's New Era: third thirdly
four 4

Pitman's New Era: four

fourth Pitman's New Era: fourth
five 5

Pitman's New Era: five

fifth Pitman's New Era: fifth
six 6

Pitman's New Era: six
Use outline when alone (numeral looks like "this" "this is" or "it is"

sixth Pitman's New Era: sixth
Use outline when alone (numeral looks like "this" "this is" or "it is")
seven 7

Pitman's New Era: seven

seventh Pitman's New Era: seventh
eight 8

Pitman's New Era: eight
Avoid outline, use numeral (clashes with numeral 1 and other outlines when unvocalised)

eighth
Although there is only one letter T in the longhand, the T and TH sounds are both pronounced i.e. eight-th
Pitman's New Era: eighth
Avoid outline (clashes with "eightieth" when unvocalised)
nine 9

Pitman's New Era: nine

ninth Pitman's New Era: ninth
ten 10

Pitman's New Era: ten
Always vocalise, so it does not resemble "eighteen". See also Distinguishing sets below

tenth Pitman's New Era: tenth
Always vocalise, so it does not resemble "eighteenth"
eleven 11

Pitman's New Era: eleven

eleventh Pitman's New Era: eleventh
twelve 12

Pitman's New Era: twelve

twelfth Pitman's New Era: twelfth
thirteen 13

Pitman's New Era: thirteen

thirteenth Pitman's New Era: thirteenth
fourteen 14

Pitman's New Era: fourteen

fourteenth Pitman's New Era: fourteenth
fifteen 15

Pitman's New Era: fifteen

fifteenth Pitman's New Era: fifteenth
sixteen 16

Pitman's New Era: sixteen

sixteenth Pitman's New Era: sixteenth
seventeen 17

Pitman's New Era: seventeen

seventeenth Pitman's New Era: seventeenth
eighteen 18

Pitman's New Era: eighteen
Avoid outline, use numeral (clashes with ten when unvocalised)

eighteenth Pitman's New Era: eighteenth
Avoid outline (clashes with tenth when unvocalised)
nineteen 19

Pitman's New Era: nineteen

nineteenth Pitman's New Era: nineteenth
twenty 20

Pitman's New Era: twenty

twentieth Pitman's New Era: twentieth
thirty 30

Pitman's New Era: thirty

thirtieth Pitman's New Era: thirtieth
forty 40

Pitman's New Era: forty

fortieth Pitman's New Era: fortieth
fifty 50

Pitman's New Era: fifty

fiftieth Pitman's New Era: fiftieth
The second Eff is not halved for T, because it would resemble "fifth"
sixty 60

Pitman's New Era: sixty

sixtieth Pitman's New Era: sixtieth
seventy 70

Pitman's New Era: seventy

seventieth Pitman's New Era: seventieth
The En is not halved for T, because it would resemble "seventh"
eighty 80

Pitman's New Era: eighty
Avoid outline, use numeral (clashes with numeral 1 when unvocalised)

eightieth Pitman's New Era: eightieth
Avoid outline, use numeral (clashes with outline for eighth when unvocalised)
ninety 90

Pitman's New Era: ninety

ninetieth Pitman's New Era: ninetieth
The second En is not halved for T, because it would resemble "ninth"
hundred* 100

Pitman's New Era: hundred

hundredth* Pitman's New Era: hundredth
thousand* 1 000 Pitman's New Era: thousand thousandth* Pitman's New Era: thousandth
million* 1 000 000 Pitman's New Era: million millionth* Pitman's New Era: millionth
billion* variable Pitman's New Era: billion billionth* Pitman's New Era: billionth
trillion variable Pitman's New Era: trillion trillionth Pitman's New Era: trillionth
milliard variable Pitman's New Era: milliard    
billiard variable Pitman's New Era: billiard    

Keep to either numerals or shorthand when writing a particular number, don't mix them together:

  • Numeral(s) only

  • Numeral(s) with contraction

  • Shorthand only

Pitman's New Era: one hundred, one hundred, one hundred
one hundred, one hundred, one hundred

Which you is use is a matter of speed and reliability in reading back, and you should not hesitate to write numerals if the outlines do not come readily to mind. If necessary write a wavy line underneath a numeral to remind you that it is not a shorthand outline.

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Improve your numerals

Examine carefully and critically how you normally write numerals and see if you can streamline them for shorthand purposes. The suggestions below remove unnecessary movements and maintain reliability against deterioration under pressure of speed. The finishing tails, whether upward or downward, should be written with a quick flick, as their length is not important. Joining up the circles i.e. 0 6 8 is unnecessary and slows you down.

These are for shorthand purposes, and you may prefer to revert to your usual versions for longhand that will be read by others.
 

1 Numeral 1 Vertical line only. Omit any top tick and horizontal base line, although these are useful if you are going back over your notes and need to clarify the numerals.
2 Numeral 2 Keep the neck straight as it descends, with no anticlockwise curve on the lower part, and the base line straight
3 Numeral 3 Start the top horizontal, with no initial curl. Flatten out the lower curve into a shallow tail, to minimise backward movement.
4 Numeral 4

Start with a vertical, not backwards sloping, line. Write the last vertical line as near as possible to the end of the horizontal one.

5 Numeral 5 Write in one piece, i.e. do not go back and put the top on afterwards. Flatten out the lower curve into a shallow tail to minimise backward movement. Maintain the top angle and horizontal line so that it does not look like letter S. It is quicker to start at the bottom as this reduces backwards movement, but ease of writing upwards will depend on the quality of your nib and paper.
6 Numeral 6 Keep compact, not tall, with the lower circle squat and wide, to prevent it looking like the outline "this" or "this is". Even so, when six is alone, the shorthand outline should be used instead of the numeral.
7

Numeral 7

Keep the downstroke at the same angle as stroke Chay, to minimise backward movement. No need for any crossbar, or little extra tick on the top line.

8 Numeral 8 Make the last upward stroke a straight line, flick it upwards with no attempt to stop at, or join it to, the starting point.
9 Numeral 9 Write 9 with an anticlockwise circle starting at top right and then make the angle for the downward stroke. Aim to give it a "balloon on a stick" shape, which does not resemble any shorthand outline. Keep the sharp angled part high up, so that even if the circle is not closed, the shape does not begin to look like a 4. If you wrote the whole in one sweeping anticlockwise curve, it would look too much like a shorthand outline.
0 Numeral 0 A narrow circle is quicker to write than a perfect geometric circle. There are two ways to prevent it looking like a 6:

(a) Start anticlockwise from the top. Finish with a final flick upwards, aiming to end the line higher than the starting point. The line will then either join up or end over the top, but it will be safe from turning into a 6.

(b) Start from the bottom and write anticlockwise. Finish lower than the starting point, so that it does not end up like a 9.

With either way, the final flick can go beyond the starting point slightly without detriment.

To differentiate between a numerical 0 and an alphabetic letter O:

0 = zero, nought = use the traditional "slashed zero" that has a forward leaning solidus written inside it.

O = alphabet letter = You could put the little hyphen mark underneath, as you normally do for an initial capital letter.

Differentiation is helpful for a reference or label but not necessary in a name:

Pitman's New Era: Mr O Jones' reference is oh eye ay one zero five (OIA105)
Mr O Jones' reference is oh eye ay one zero five (OIA105)

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Use shorthand outline for:

(a) Single numbers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 (not 8)

Pitman's New Era: We have two offices, three vans and nine employees.
We have two offices, three vans and nine employees.

Pitman's New Era: Take two pounds of flour, three eggs and four cups of water.
Take two pounds of flour, three eggs and four cups of water.

Pitman's New Era: dancing the two-step, two-seater sofa, dressed up to the nines
dancing the two-step, two-seater sofa, dressed up to the nines


Pitman's New Era: People came in two's and threes. He is all at sixes and sevens.
People came in two's
* and threes. He is all at sixes and sevens.

*Apostrophe keeps the longhand readable

Pitman's New Era: We live in Sevenoaks. Fourth of July celebrations
We live in Sevenoaks. Fourth of July celebrations

Pitman's New Era: The restaurant is called Seventh Heaven.
The restaurant is called Seventh Heaven.

(b) Generalised and round amounts used in narrative text, as one shorthand outline is better than using two numerals:

Pitman's New Era: There were fifty people at the meeting. Several hundred people answered.
There were fifty people at the meeting. Several hundred people answered.

Pitman's New Era: thousands of animals, tens of thousands of stars, thanks a million
thousands of animals, tens of thousands of stars, thanks a million

Pitman's New Era: not a million miles from here
not a million miles from here

Pitman's New Era: Thousand Island dressing, the Roaring Forties
Thousand Island dressing, the Roaring Forties

Pitman's New Era: fifties-style clothes, over-sixties club
fifties-style clothes, over-sixties club

Pitman's New Era: She is in her twenties. One part per million
She is in her twenties. One part per million

Pitman's New Era: The old English county division was called a Hundred.
The old English county division was called a Hundred.

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Use numeral for:

Amounts greater than single figures, and which are not rounded amounts as above, are quicker and clearer to write in numerals, rather than a pair of outlines:

Pitman's New Era: We sold twenty-five cars and ninety-nine bikes.
We sold twenty-five cars and ninety-nine bikes.

Pitman's New Era: Five thousand four hundred and twenty-three members came to the meeting.
Five thousand four hundred and twenty-three members came to the meeting.

8  80, 8th 80th Use numerals, as the pairs of shorthand outlines are identical when vowels are omitted. Also the outlines for eight and eighty are identical to numeral one and "it" "do" and other words using this single stroke:

Pitman's New Era: I have it, I have one, I have eight, I have eighty
I have it, I have one, I have eight, I have eighty

Pitman's New Era: On the eighth of January he celebrates his eightieth birthday.
On the eighth of January he celebrates his eightieth birthday.

Pitman's New Era: One computer, eight laptops and eighty mobile phones
One computer, eight laptops and eighty mobile phones

Pitman's New Era: figure of eight, pieces of eight, an eight-part series
figure of eight, pieces of eight, an eight-part series

Exception: see 8 and 10 in phrases below

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Distinguishing sets

Ten, 18, tenth, 18th
Ten and tenth are reasonably common words, as our counting system is based on tens, and it is quicker to use the shorthand for that, as long as you always vocalise them and use numerals for eighteen and eighteenth:

Pitman's New Era: ten boys and eighteen girls
ten boys and eighteen girls


Pitman's New Era: His tenth birthday is on the eighteenth of the month.
His tenth birthday is on the eighteenth of the month.

6, Ith used for thousands/thousandths, Dee used for dollars
Always use shorthand for a lone six.
Ith+Circle S for thousands: keep the curve shallow and the circle small.
Dee for dollars: keep the stroke straight.
Bee for billionths: keep the stroke straight.

six, fifty-six, five thousandths, five dollars, five days, five billionthsPitman's New Era: six, fifty-six, five thousandths, five dollars, five days, five billionths

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Number Contractions

En = hundred/hundredth
Ith = thousand/thousandth
Em = million/millionth
Bee = billion/billionth

The contractions are used with numerals to avoid writing a succession of zeros:

Pitman's New Era: one hundred, two thousand, three million, four billion
one hundred, two thousand, three million, four billion

Pitman's New Era: ten million four hundred and three, eight thousand and four
ten million four hundred and three, eight thousand and four

Don't use the contractions with shorthand outlines:

Pitman's New Era: three thousand
three thousand

Pitman's New Era: six hundred

six hundred

The same contractions are used for the ordinal numbers, and it is clear what is meant because of the S on the end:

Pitman's New Era: five hundredths, seven millionths, eight billionths six thousandths
five hundredths, seven millionths, eight billionths
but six thousandths is clearer due to the similarity of the numeral and the Ith+s.

Don't add an extra Ith stroke onto the contraction for the "-th" part of the ordinal number, as that stroke is already used for thousand. If you think the contraction is not clear enough for ordinals, e.g. when there is no "-s" on the end, then use the full shorthand outlines:

Pitman's New Era: one hundredth, one thousandth, one millionth, one billionth
one hundredth, one thousandth, one millionth, one billionth

Pitman's New Era: seven millionths
seven millionths

Insert the vowel in "ounces" so that it does not get read as "hundredths":

Pitman's New Era: seventy-six hundredths, seventy-six ounces
seventy-six hundredths, seventy-six ounces

The contractions can be joined to each other:

Pitman's New Era: nine hundred thousand, nine hundred million, nine thousand million
nine hundred thousand, nine hundred million, nine thousand million

Join the next outline if convenient:

Pitman's New Era: nine thousand members, seven hundred people, one hundred plus, two hundred words, three hundred yards
nine thousand members, seven hundred people, one hundred plus, two hundred words, three hundred yards

IF using Ith for month, ensure it is clearly intersected or in full:

Pitman's New Era: two hundred-thousandths, two hundred months
two hundred-thousandths, two hundred months

If the number has no zeros to avoid, then all numerals are better, you don't need to insert any contraction:

Pitman's New Era:
Eight thousand seven hundred and twenty-six visitors came to the park.

If there is a pause, you might find you have written numeral 8 and an Ith, and then realise it would have been better to use all numerals. Leave a leave a slight gap and continue to write the remaining numerals. If you close the gap the Ith will not stand out as being a stroke rather than a numeral such as 1 or 6.

Use the following for -st  and -rd after numerals. This is following the hybrid longhand convention, and it is probably more legible to just use the proper shorthand outlines for all of it:

Pitman's New Era: 21st, 23rd, twenty-first, twenty-third
21st, 23rd, twenty-first, twenty-third

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Long slash

Use this after numerals to indicate "thousand" instead of Ith, which avoids the problem of the Ith looking like a one or a six:
 

Pitman's New Era: two thousand, eight thousand, five thousand pounds, six thousand dollars
two thousand, eight thousand, five thousand pounds, six thousand dollars

Use the slash before dates to replace the first two numbers of the current century.
Suggestion: Use double slash for the previous century:

Pitman's New Era: two thousand and one (2001), two thousand and twelve (2012), nineteen ninety-one (1992)
two thousand and one (2001), two thousand and twelve (2012), nineteen ninety-one (1991)

Don't allow any hook to appear at the beginning of the slash that might make it look like a Yay, compare euro below

Write other centuries with normal methods as appropriate:

Pitman's New Era: eighteen thirty-seven, in the eighteen sixties, in the seventeen hundreds
eighteen thirty-seven, in the eighteen sixties, in the seventeen hundreds

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Percent

After a numeral,  use stroke Pee for "percent" and two strokes for "per cent per annum". If there is no numeral, use the full outlines:

Pitman's New Era: five percent (5%), five percent per annum (5% pa), one hundred percent (100%)
five percent (5%), five percent per annum (5% pa), one hundred percent (100%)

Pitman's New Era: an increase of one million percent, an increase of a million percent
an increase of one million percent, an increase of a million percent

Pitman's New Era: What percent of people own a car? percentage percentage-wise
What percent of people own a car? percentage percentage-wise

Latin "per centum" = "by the hundred" and "per annum" = "by the year, each year"

"Or" pairs

Only three of the following omit the "or", the rest join better with it included:

Pitman's New Era: one or two, two or three, three or four, four or five, five or six
one or two, two or three, three or four, four or five, five or six

Pitman's New Era: six or seven, seven or eight, eight or nine, nine or ten
six or seven, seven or eight
*, eight or nine*, nine or ten*

*These are the only occasions when "eight" and "ten" are written in shorthand (other than in compound words)

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Currency

Pitman's New Era: ten pounds, ten pence, ten pennies, five hundred pounds
ten pounds
*, ten pence, ten pennies, five hundred pounds*

*Insert the diphthong in "pounds" to differentiate from "pence"

Pitman's New Era: four dollars, four hundred dollars, four thousand dollars, four million dollars, dollars
four dollars, four hundred dollars, four thousand dollars, four million dollars
*, dollars

*You could write the Dee above the line as before, but here this keeps pen travel to a minimum

Pitman's New Era: five rupees, five hundred rupees, five thousand rupees, five million rupees, rupees
five rupees, five hundred rupees, five thousand rupees, five million rupees, rupees

Write "rupees" in full if you need to further distinguish it from the third position short form "hours"

For "thousand pounds" include the Circle S (representing the middle S of that word) to make the join possible:

Pitman's New Era: fifteen thousand pounds, many thousands of pounds
fifteen thousand pounds, many thousands of pounds

You can use any appropriate consonant stroke to represent your own currency, but you must check thoroughly whether there might be any clashes with other outlines or numerals.

Pitman's New Era: cent centimo dinar euro franc krona
cent centimo dinar euro franc krona

Pitman's New Era: peso shekel shilling rand ruble yuan
peso shekel shilling rand ruble yuan

Some currency signs are placed before the numerals in longhand text, but in shorthand you should write everything in the exact order that it is spoken, regardless of how it will eventually be transcribed in longhand.

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Fractions

Pitman's New Era: half, half-time, third, one-third, two-thirds
half, half-time, third, one-third, two-thirds

Pitman's New Era: quarter, three-quarters
quarter, three-quarters

Pitman's New Era: An eighth of the people were present. Five-twelfths were in favour.
An eighth of the people were present. Five-twelfths
* were in favour.

*Or use numerals, as below, whichever is easiest

Pitman's New Era: He ate half the pie. We saw two-thirds of the staff.
He ate half the pie. We saw two-thirds of the staff.

With a numeral, use the following brief method for quarters and thirds:

Pitman's New Era: one and a quarter (1), one and a half (1), one and three-quarters (1)
one and a quarter (1), one and a half (1), one and three-quarters (1)

A non-textbook suggestion that extends the principle:

Pitman's New Era: one and a third (1 1/3), one and two-thirds (1 2/3)
one and a third (1 1/3), one and two-thirds (1 2/3)

Other fractions should use whatever method is clearest:

Pitman's New Era: one eighth, five twelfths, forty-nine fiftieths
one eighth
*, five twelfths, forty-nine fiftieths

*It would be misleading to use the fraction for "an eighth"

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Decimals

Write in the normal format for your country, using numerals:

Pitman's New Era: one point five, one point five, one comma five, point, period, comma
one point five, one point five, one comma five, point, period, comma

Time

Pitman's New Era: two ay em, two pee em
two ay em, two pee em

Latin: am = ante meridiem = before midday; pm = post meridiem = after midday

Pitman's New Era: twenty-one hundred hours (2100 hrs) oh seven hundred hours (0700 hrs)
24-hour clock: twenty-one hundred hours (2100 hrs) oh seven hundred hours (0700 hrs)

Powers

Better as numerals with superscript, but shorthand is shown for reference. Superscripts can be underlined to provide further distinction if necessary:

Pitman's New Era: five squared, five cubed
five squared (52), five cubed (53)

Pitman's New Era: five to the forty-fifth
five to the forty-fifth (545)

Pitman's New Era: five to the power of forty-five
five to the power of forty-five (545)

Pitman's New Era: ten to the minus one, to the nth degree
ten to the minus one (10-1), to the nth degree

nth = an indefinite and infinitely large ordinal number, suggesting highest or most extreme, pronounced "enth"

Superscript is useful for Bible chapter and verse references, or similar such as page and line numbers:

Pitman's New Era: Genesis chapter one verse nine, first Timothy six eleven, page 3 line 4
Genesis chapter one verse nine, first Timothy six eleven, page 3 line
* 4

Transcribe as Gen 1:9, 1 Tim 5:36  OR  Gen 1 v 9, 1 Tim 5 v 36

*You would assume it was line/para/item etc as appropriate, but if necessary write that outline as well

Pitman's New Era: chapter verse paragraph para line item
chapter verse paragraph para line item

Pitman's New Era: footer footnote header heading article section
footer footnote header heading article section

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Dates

AD and BC are best written in lower case longhand. Sometimes AD is said before the number:

Pitman's New Era: in the year five hundred AD, in AD three hundred
in the year five hundred AD, in AD three hundred

Pitman's New Era: two thousand BC, a million years BC
two thousand BC, a million years BC

AD = Anno Domini = Latin "in the year of (our) Lord"

BC = Before Christ

BCE = Before Common/Current/Christian Era = alternative to BC

CE = Common/Current/Christian Era = alternative to AD

Additional vocabulary

Pitman's New Era: add addition additional approaching approximately approximation
add addition additional approaching approximately approximation

Pitman's New Era: average chart flow-chart bar pie-chart calculate calculation
average chart flow-chart bar pie-chart calculate calculation

Pitman's New Era: cardinal ordinary centenary century comma
cardinal ordinal centenary century comma

Pitman's New Era: compare comparison decade decimal diagram
compare comparison decade decimal diagram

Pitman's New Era: divide division double dozen elevenses even odd
divide division double dozen elevenses even odd

Pitman's New Era: equal unequal estimate estimation exact exactitude exactly
equal* unequal* estimate estimation exact exactitude exactly   *Short Form

Pitman's New Era: figure fiver forecast four-square foursome
figure fiver forecast four-square foursome

Pitman's New Era: four-footed fourposter fraction graph graphic integer
four-footed fourposter fraction graph graphic integer

Pitman's New Era: increase increment mean median millennium
increase increment mean median millennium

Pitman's New Era: millionaire billionaire multiply multiplication
millionaire billionaire multiply multiplication

Pitman's New Era: myriad negative negatively positive positively
myriad negative negatively positive positively

Pitman's New Era: nought oh/owe zero numeral numerical
nought oh/owe* zero numeral numerical     *Short Form

Pitman's New Era: once twice thrice pair point precise precisely
once twice thrice pair point precise precisely

Pitman's New Era: proportion quadruple ratio rationalise reduce reduction
proportion* quadruple ratio rationalise reduce reduction   *Contraction

Pitman's New Era: remain remainder section sixer subtract subtraction
remain remainder section sixer subtract subtraction

Pitman's New Era: summary summarise tenner/tenor tenpins thou thous thou
summary summarise tenner/tenor tenpins thou* thous* compare thou (=you)

*Abbreviation = thousand/s

Pitman's New Era: triple three-dimensional threefold threesome twosome eightsome
triple three-dimensional threefold threesome twosome* eightsome

*Most "two-" words use the short form as below

Pitman's New Era: two-part twofold grand total totalling totally totality
two-part twofold grand total totalling totally totality

Pitman's New Era: gazillion squillion umpteen umpteenth
gazillion squillion umpteen umpteenth

gazillion squillion = an indeterminate very large number, used for effect or emphasis
umpteen = an indeterminate number, possibly with the suggestion of being excessive

Pitman's New Era: number/numbered numb number numbest

number/numbered* but note similarly spelled adjective: numb number numbest (without physical feeling)

*Short Form

 

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"Whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable if anything is excellent or praiseworthy think about such things." (Philippians 4:8)

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